Old Dog

gatekeeper
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A Gatekeeper, Pyronia tithonus, a girl down from the moor.
I am gradually acquiring a very basic repertoire of common butterflies. So far, this year I have learned 5 new tricks. Good dog.

peacock
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Almost as numerous as the Red Admirals — the Peacock, Inachis io.
It’s not nick-named the butterfly bush for nothing … Jeez.

tortoise
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A Small Tortoiseshell, Aglais urticae and then lastly a Speckled Wood, Pararge aegeria, up from the valley.

speckled-wood
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Luxuriating in a beautiful echo of summer down here.

Swamped

lady

Just wandered out to get an image I needed of the sky and found the buddleja covered in butterflies, including this beautiful Painted Lady, Vanessa cardui. I didn’t know they were migrants too. Along with the geese and the cuckoos and the robins and the starlings and the …

I’ve got a horrible feeling that if we ever did stop all freedom of movement we’d die of lonely silent hungry thirsty brain-dead BOREDOM.

Gunwalloe

flower
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I’m not sure what it is but there were lots of these beautiful little things on the cliffs above Church Cove.

nightshade
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Now that I can identify: Atropa Belladonna. I assume the berries are unripe, I’m sure they go black but the blue and red were incredibly intense.

dice
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Down at Gunwalloe Fishing Cove, an exposed seam of quartz is breaking down.

landscape
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Having dutifully applied my flying ointment (see above) I rode the air and looked down from a great height and saw … errr … or not. Scale independence.

dragon
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… found a dragon trapped inside a rock … sort of … if you tilt your head and squint a bit.

stone
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And in the graveyard of St Winwalo’s Church, the saddest of stories in a few terse lines. Life really does hang by a thread.

And the year turns

fire and bread
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It’s Autumn here.

Sunny Safari

scarab
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One of a few Rose Chafers we saw patrolling the brambles, beautiful jewel-like scarabs (their vivid green produced structurally by left-circularly-polarised light rather than pigment, he said), Cetonia aurata, on the cliffs between Cape Cornwall and Sennen Cove.

gatekeeper
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There were clouds of butterflies in the fields behind the cliffs but the only one who was vain enough to pose for long was a male Gatekeeper, Pyronia tithonus.

longhorns
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And a herd of magnificent time-slipped English Longhorns.